E39 M5: Must Have Mods

Okay, so you’ve already made the best decision of your life: you bought an E39 M5. Now, what minor (or major) modifications will make a great car even greater?

Let me start out by saying that this article is very subjective.  Each M5 owner has his or her own expectations for the car.  Some people are after pure performance, while others are allured by a refined, quiet luxury car that also has balls.  Many of us are somewhere in-between.  I bought my 2000 M5 in 2010.  It was my first car, I was 17 years old. Somehow, I didn’t kill myself.  By 2011, the void of E39 M5 DIY content online had pissed me off enough that I decided to spearhead the lack of online content with E39Source. This has allowed me to connect with hundreds of fellow E39 (M5) owners.  I would never say that I have seen it all, but I have been exposed to a lot of very tasteful (and garish) mods. In this article, in no particular order, I will list and describe several ‘must-have’ modifications, per my taste. Continue reading

Luke’s 2000 BMW M5 Introduction

The 90s were the best…

Let me begin by saying that I may be slightly biased when it comes to my assured claim that the E39 M5 is the greatest sports sedan of all time. While there are many other remarkable performance sedans out there (E28 M5, E34 M5, W211 E55, C5 RS6, and countless others), the E39 has held a special place in my heart from a young age. Not many other sedans have aged as gracefully and the E39 M5 represents the perfect blend between past and present in the M5 lineage. While its performance is not as remarkably impressive by today’s standards, the E39 M5 blends the right amount of driver involvement with refinement. Continue reading

Mike’s 528i & M5 Introduction

Hey guys, thanks for letting me join E39source!  I’ve been a YouTube subscriber  for quite a while now, and actually met some of you at the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix last summer.  My name is Mike, and I’m 25 years old and live/work in West Chester, PA.  I currently have two E39s: a 1997 528i, and a 2000 M5. Continue reading

BMW N54 Tuning & Maintenance Guide

In the past few years the N54 twin turbo 3.0L Inline-6 has gained the reputation of being an easily tunable and powerful engine. With the N54 aging and the increasing number of modifications available, we are bound to begin seeing more blown engines and turbos. Although the block and internals are very strong, the N54 is prone to issues without the proper maintenance and repairs. Whether your N54 is stock or running a large single turbo set up, this guide will ensure your engine is running at its best.

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BMW M50-M52 Intake Modification

With this modification, your M52B25 or M52B28 engine will make more power.

The M52B25 and M52B28 engine can be found in the E36, E39, E38, and in some early BMW E46 models.  It is not the easiest modification, but if you are at least a little handy, it is not difficult.  Some people say that this will gain an additional 20HP, while some say it won’t give you any.  I believe that there are power benefits.

In the picture below, you see on the left an M52 intake, and on the right, an M50 intake.
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Say Hello to Andrew’s new Benz!

My past BMW’s were fun cars.  I had a great time driving them, and I learned a lot fixing them.  However, they got a bit repetitive after having cars so similar: the E53 X5, E36 318ti, and the E36 328i.  These all shared so much in common that I could go through the motions to change out a thermostat or replace an oil filter housing gasket with my eyes closed.  So, what does a car guy do when they need a new project to tinker on?

He moves on and gets a 1995 W124 Mercedes E320!

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E39 M5 S62 Engine Reliability

IMG_1030A very common topic, S62 longevity.  I could write a book about this, but I’ll try not to. Firstly… I am no expert.  I’m just an owner of an E39 M5 for a little over 5 years, and 50,000 miles now.  I am fairly active in the community though, so I do feel that I can talk about this some.
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The S62 can last 300,000 miles.  The S62 can also fail at 40,000 miles.  There seem to be more instances of higher miles than lower, however.  These are the primary weak points of the S62: